Game Design: Developed Projects

The Great Library: An Ancient Egyptian RPG

The Great Library: Campaign and Analysis

Rules for Play: 

Basic Rules for Turn Play: 
1. If you are in a new setting, the game master first describes the setting that you are in. Afterward, players take turns performing actions in the setting until they exit the setting. 

2. A turn is completed under the following system: 

The player describes what kind of action they would like to perform in the setting. 
a. The game master then offers the result of their actions. 
b. The player then has time for one reaction to the game masters result. 
c. The game master tells the player the result of their action before moving on to the next player. 

i. If the player is left in the middle of an action as a result of this second action, they are left in suspense as other players get a turn. Other players may carry on the line of action from this player’s turn. For example:

Player: “I would like to open this box.”
Game master: “Roll a dice in order to see if you can open the box.”
Player: “My roll is successful and I open the box.”
Game master: “The box opens and reveals a scroll.”

In this case, the player cannot then use another action in order to react to the scroll. However, other players may reach for the scroll.

If not, then the player must wait until it is their turn before they can continue their action. This is to try and prevent turns from taking too long. 

3. How dice are used in this game: 
a. Dice are only used to figure out how effective a player’s action was within a game. This is determined by rolling a D20 and by taking into account the character’s affinity. 
b. If a player declares an action, the DM offers a Difficulty Rating (DR) for that action. The player must roll that number, or higher, to succeed.
i. In the case of a success, the DM recounts the outcome of the action. 
ii. In the case of a failure, the DM recounts the outcome of the action and any side-effects as a result (ie, player injury, enemies alerted, etc). 
c. If a player has an affinity for the action performed, the player adds two points to their roll. 

Player Actions
1. These are common action categories that all players can do. When a player declares an action, the DM may ask a player to roll for the relevant action category.
2. Affinities (section 5, below) can affect a player’s success for a relevant action.

Common Action Types

1. Passive-physical: (walking, pulling or pushing on objects, opening things). These actions only correspond to actions that are taken by a player’s a character but does not involve another character or combat. 

2. Combat: These actions only entail actions that involve a player’s character acting towards another character in violence. 

3. This may include throwing an object in anger/aggression, charging at an opponent, hitting something, etc. 

4. Literacy: These actions include most “academic” actions. They include actions that involve language, reading, and writing. Characters that are academics have an affinity for these actions. 
Beyond these actions, each character has an affinity for actions that are related to their specialty. For example, if a character is trying to figure out where they are in correlation to a map that they discovered during the game, a character with an affinity for geography will be able to read the map better and so figure out where the players are more quickly. 

Affinities

1. Each character has affinities for certain activities or disciplines based on their background. This is a characteristic that enables players to succeed in certain actions over others. 

2. In game terms, a player has a primary and secondary affinity.
a. The Primary Affinity lends a +4 bonus to any roll for actions falling within that affinity.
b. The Secondary Affinity lends a +2 bonus to rolls applicable to that affinity. For example, if a player’s Primary Affinity is “literary”, then that player will get a +4 bonus to reading, understanding, and deciphering any scrolls. 

3. Player affinities are noted on their character cards. 
 

Created Maps

The following levels were designed based on temple plans found during my research (see Figure [] to []). 

 The Great Library: Campaign and Analysis, Figure 1: Level 01

The Great Library: Campaign and Analysis, Figure 1: Level 01

 The Great Library: Campaign and Analysis, Figure 1: Level 02

The Great Library: Campaign and Analysis, Figure 1: Level 02

 The Great Library: Campaign and Analysis, Figure 1: Level 03

The Great Library: Campaign and Analysis, Figure 1: Level 03

Character Sheets

 

Research for World Building

 Research for World Building, Figure 1: The Great Library of Alexandria, O. Von Corven, 19th century. [1]

Research for World Building, Figure 1: The Great Library of Alexandria, O. Von Corven, 19th century. [1]

Alexandria was built as a Greek city and so new construction and urban planning were modeled after Greek cities (broad streets, grid planning, etc). The city also contained Greek civic buildings such as a theater, council, law courts, and a gymnasium. Alexandra was a city in which the civilians were multi-ethnic. Citizens were not only of Greek descent, but of Italian, Syrian, Libyan, Arab, Persian, and even Indian. However, the primary language spoke was Greek. Despite the diversity within the city’s population, there was a tiered social structure that placed “true” Alexandrian citizens at the top. Meaning, that the location of your domicile did not grant you citizenship. Alexandrian citizenship was hereditary and could only be attained as such. [2]

The Great Library of Alexandria was a part of the greater Alexandrian’s museum precint. The museum and its precint was a cult centre dedicated to the Muses. Although there are little specifics available about the library, it is known, through letters, that the library’s collection of texts was vast and could have been as large as 400,000 thousand scrolls (the main method of storing texts). In 48 BC, Julius Caesar caused the first main destruction of the library. During a war to conquer Alexandria for Cleopatra, Julius Caesar burned the Alexandrian ships. A fire which spread from the docks to the library. However, there are arguments against the general idea that this fire burned the main library, instead maybe burning different text storages closer to the docks. [3]

 Research for World Building, Figure 2: Columns in the hall of the Isis temple built under Ptolemy VI [4]

Research for World Building, Figure 2: Columns in the hall of the Isis temple built under Ptolemy VI [4]

 Research for World Building, Figure 3: Colonnade in the Horus temple at Edfu [5]

Research for World Building, Figure 3: Colonnade in the Horus temple at Edfu [5]

 Research for World Building, Figure 4: Reconstruction of a column pair of the kiosk of Nectanebo 1 on Philae [6]

Research for World Building, Figure 4: Reconstruction of a column pair of the kiosk of Nectanebo 1 on Philae [6]

Research for World Building, Works Cited: 

[1] “Library of Alexandria.” Wikipedia. N.p., n.d. Web. 4 Mar. 2017. <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Library_of_Alexandria>.
[2] Venit, Marjorie S. . “Alexandria.” The Oxford Handbook of Roman Egypt. Oxford, United Kingdom: Oxford U Press, 2012. 103-121. Print.
[3] Ibid.
[4]  Arnold, Dieter. “Ptolemy VI Philometor” Temples of the Last Pharaohs. New York and Oxford: Oxford U Press, 1999. 190. Print.
[5] Arnold, Dieter. “Ptolemy X Alexander I” Temples of the Last Pharaohs. New York and Oxford: Oxford U Press, 1999. 218. Print.
[6]Arnold, Dieter. “The Buildings of the 28th to 30th Dynasties” Temples of the Last Pharaohs. New York and Oxford: Oxford U Press, 1999. 121. Print